Books

15 Books Like 'Severance' To Add to Your Reading List

15 Books Like ‘Severance’ To Add to Your Reading List

Mike Kim From its very first episode, severity established itself as a high concept show that seamlessly blurred styles and genres. Viewers were riveted by its unique take on work-life balance, biting corporate satire, and often absurd, near-Lynchian visual imagery (waffle parties, anyone?). While a second season has been confirmed, a release date remains far …

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Berks having problems with electronic poll books

Berks having problems with electronic poll books

Polls in Berks County were ordered to stay open for an extra hour Tuesday night. The move was made because of an issue with new electronic poll books being used countywide for the first time Tuesday that caused problems at several polling locations. Attorneys representing the county Republican and Democratic committees earlier Tuesday filed emergency …

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The Problem with Blaming Robots For Taking Our Jobs

The Problem with Blaming Robots For Taking Our Jobs

In the late nineteen-forties, Delmar Harder, a vice-president at Ford, popularized the term “automation”—a “nickname,” he said, for the increased mechanization at the company’s Detroit factory. Harder was mostly talking about the automatic transfer of car parts between machines, but the concept soon grew legs—and sometimes a robotic arm—to encompass a range of practices and …

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Susan Hartman's new book, "City of Refugees: The Story of Three Newcomers Who Breathed Life into a Dying American Town" profiles three refugees in Utica over several years.

Susan Hartman’s new book follows the lives of Utica’s refugee families

In August 2014, Susan Hartman profiled Sadia Ambure in a New York Times article about Utica’s refugee population. Nearly eight years later, Hartman has delivered a deeper look at Utica’s refugee and immigrant population in her new book, “City of Refugees: The Story of Three Newcomers Who Breathed Life into a Dying American Town,” set …

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What Do We Lose—and Gain—As Book Tours Move Online?  ‹ LiteraryHub

What Do We Lose—and Gain—As Book Tours Move Online? ‹ LiteraryHub

When I was young, in a distant century, there was an odd feature of the literary community: celebrated authors writing essays for magazines or newspaper book sections chronicling the horrors of their tours. Usually amusingly, sometimes just trying to be. Laments about arriving at a bookstore to find many people waiting, but no copies of …

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Introducing The Atlantic's Expanded Books Section

Introducing The Atlantic’s Expanded Books Section

When Emily Dickinson encountered her first real book as a child, she experienced a moment of pure, joyful recognition. “This, then, is a book!” she exclaimed. “And there are more of them!” Atlantic would go on to publish Dickinson’s poems; Perhaps more important, it introduced her to a lifelong mentor, Thomas Wentworth Higginson. After Dickinson …

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America's Wars Are Fought by Relatively Few People.  That's a Problem for Phil Klay.

America’s Wars Are Fought by Relatively Few People. That’s a Problem for Phil Klay.

“War remains a large part of who we are as Americans,” he writes in his introduction, “with almost a sixth of our federal budget going to defense, keeping troops deployed in 800 military bases around the world and engaging in counterterror missions in 85 countries. And yet, thanks to a series of political and strategic …

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